Surviving New England Winter: Cold Weather Essentials

suriving-new-england-winter

When you think of winter, you think of New England (at least you better). With our incredible mountains, penchant for cold weather sports, and knowledge of all things REI and EMS, we kind of have the whole cold weather survival thing down. We got over 100 inches of snow last winter, for God’s sakes!

As a staunch New Englander who genuinely believes we winter better than anyone else in the country, I have a little bit of know-how in the cold weather, snowy survival realm. For help any New England novices or winter wimps, here are my top winter essentials:

chapstick-sally-hansen-oil

Keeping moisturized:

It’s no secret that the cold winter weather sucks the life right out of your hands an lips, and honestly, it’s not a cute look. To keep my lips from flaking, I regularly apply ChapStick Total Hydration — in fact, I think it’s pretty safe to say that I’m actually obsessed. This stuff is so smooth and tastes smells so delicious. Right now I’m using the vanilla scent, but it also comes in a citrus scent. Keep your eyes peeled for pumpkin and peppermint flavors around Christmastime!

I’m not sure if this is just a Sara thing, or any everyone thing, but during the winter my cuticles split like crazy. It’s not the cutest look, especially as someone who loves to paint her nails on the reg. By far, the best thing I’ve used to remedy this issue is the Sally Hansen Cuticle Oil. I just brush this directly onto my cuticles before bed, read a few pages of a book while letting it soak in, and then rub it all the way in before heading under the covers.

On the topic of reading a little bit before bed, a total winter move is to set up shop in front of the fire getting lost in a good book. Right now I’m chipping away at The Bully Pulpit, a book about the golden age of journalism and the relationship between Teddy Roosevelt and William Howard Taft. While I’m kind of digging this book, I’m going to be real with you, it might not be for everyone. I was a history major in college and work as a straight up news journalist during the day, so this book is kind of my ish, but for people who aren’t into non-fiction, it’ll be hard to get into.

Winter Essentials 2

Dress to impress.

And by dress to impress I mean wearing necklaces with skis and really warm leggings. I got this necklace on Etsy and I’m literally obsessed with it. I wear it on the day of the first snow every season, and rock it pretty regularly the rest of ski season. These necklaces are super cheap (10 bucks!) and can be customized for anything — best friends, ballerinas, tennis rackets.

As an avid skier, winter sports and leggings enthusiast, I think it’s vital to have weather-appropriate leggings. These ones are from Eastern Mountain Sports (EMS). While they don’t really come cheap (about $34), they have Techwick, which is really great for keeping you warm. It wicks any sweat out of the leggings, keeping you toasty your whole day.

Disclaimer: The ChapStick Total Moisture was graciously sent to me by ChapStick’s PR folks. However, all of my opinions are completely my own and entirely authentic.

 

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6 thoughts on “Surviving New England Winter: Cold Weather Essentials

  1. Haha love that line ” Dress to impress. And by dress I mean wear a necklace with leggings” Ain’t it the truth on those dear god awful winter days?! I need some cuticle oil in my life, so thank you for reminding me! Stay toasty this winter sara

  2. I’m obsessed with that chapstick, it’s the BEST. And I also bought that cuticle oil as well! I actually just moved out here to the east coast in the DC area from Hawaii, so this will be my first real winter! I’m terrified hahaha

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